Fishing the Green River in a Hyde Drift Boat – Part 2

Fishing the Green River in a Hyde Drift Boat – Part 2

You can find part one of this trip report here. The second day on the river we ran the B section; it is the only part of the float with any rapids of concern, even at the low flow rate of 850CFS. The last time I went through this rapid, I had a boat full of gear and people and opted to walked the boat down the side of the rapid. We planned to do this once again, but that changed after some encouragement from Forest Service workers who were their cleaning the camp. Fishing the Green After some words of wisdom, they ran the rapid and showed me the line. So with a little anxiety, I hopped on the oars right after these guys and rowed through the rapid, banging off several rocks with no consequences, luckily. The water was low and the moves are quick and tight! After getting the boat safely through the long, shallow, rocky rapid that is Red Creek, it’s always a good idea to do some fishing. This area is where the Brown trout population increases, as does the size of fish. The fish in the rapid were willing to take my fly, as always, and fishing was again spectacular. The water is a bit fast through here, so once again I was using a standard 3 fly nymph rig. Red Creek was spitting just enough muddy water into the Green to make it easier to fool the fish, but not enough to ruin the fishing. Perfect! Fishing the green After having lunch and resting my fish fighting arm, it was time to float on. I was most looking forward to fishing the bottom half of the Green, as this is where the terrain opens up from tight red rock canyon country to more open desert meadows and valleys. This is terrestrial country. For those of you that don’t know, fly anglers live to fish terrestrials – Ants, Beetles, Crickets tied w/ foam and big hooks.  Big fish regularly are fooled by these pieces of meat and it was going off on the lower half of the river.  The plop of the big foam fly was drawing in all sorts of big fish.  The weather was perfect, with just a bit of a breeze and lots of sunshine.  These big flies are easy to see and cast, and you don’t need a perfect drift to fool the fish. A twitch here and there of the fly has been known to draw the fish in.

Ryan “Opie” Caggiano is 2nd Tracks’ numero uno ski tech and resident Fly Fishing master. When not at work he likes nothing more than to float lazily down river with his fly rod in hand and his dog Lady at the bow. Stay tuned for the final post in the series!

 

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